Monday, February 11, 2013

Midnight Poem

Diposkan oleh Ferina Aquila di 2:56 AM
Reaksi: 

Gue lagi iseng baca diary gue dulu waktu gue masih merasakan sakit maha-dahsyat sebelum gue di kemoterapi. Kebanyakan isinya sumpah serapah yaaa~ hahaha! Kalo buku harian ini dibaca anak dibawah umur mungkin dia ngira itu buku absen satwa liar di Afrika. Dan kalo bener-bener dibaca, sungguhlah anak tersebut memiliki perbendaharaan kosa kata kasar terbanyak sepanjang sejarah anak-anak.

Diantara lembaran caci maki dan ungkapan rasa sakit yg tumpah, gue menemukan secarik puisi dalam bahasa Inggris yg pernah gue tulis. Gue ini gak pinter merangkai kata-kata indah pake bahasa Indonesia. Jadi waktu itu gue sengaja bikinnya in English biar ketutup betapa payahnya gue bikin puisi pake bahasa Indonesia. So, this is it! Midnight poem by Ferina Aquila.

Midnight Poem
By: Ferina Aquila

When night comes and covers the sky with its darkness
When all doors are closed
and lamps turned off
When people getting sink into their dreams
Their beautiful dreams ...
Here i am ...
Lying on my bed with my eyes open and whispering into my self
‘why?’

Why this happens to me?
Why i have to feel pain more than others feel?
Why everything seem so blur?

Everyone starts gone slowly one by one ...
No ‘goodbye’ word spoken because they just leave ...
They don’t know how much i need them
They don’t know i can’t stand the pain alone
I’m fallen into the worst nightmare i wish i never face it
My dreams get burn and i can’t see the future
By now, everything won’t be as good as yesterday

Deep in my heart, i miss ‘the old me’
I miss my old life where there was more laugh than tears
Where i can catch up my dream
Where i can stand by myself without anyone helps
And i miss my freedom for doing anything i like

I wish i could go back to my past
To fix anything i can fix
To do anything i haven’t do yet
Because this is so tragic
I guess i’m getting mad by the torture
and i wanna die right now ...

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